0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder
Chadi G. Abdallah, M.D.; Lihong Jiang, Ph.D.; Henk M. De Feyter, Ph.D.; Madonna Fasula, A.P.R.N.; John H. Krystal, M.D.; Douglas L. Rothman, Ph.D.; Graeme F. Mason, Ph.D.; Gerard Sanacora, M.D., Ph.D.
Am J Psychiatry 2014;:. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.14010067
View Author and Article Information

From the Department of Psychiatry, the Department of Diagnostic Imaging, and the Magnetic Resonance Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; the Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven; and the Clinical Neuroscience Division, National Center for PTSD, West Haven, Conn.

Presented in part in a poster session at the 51st annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Hollywood, Fla., December 2–6, 2012.

Address correspondence to Dr. Sanacora (gerard.sanacora@yale.edu).

Copyright © 2014 by the American Psychiatric Association

Received January 19, 2014; Revised April 04, 2014; Accepted June 02, 2014.

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

Objective  Emerging evidence suggests that abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in major depression, we used carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with major depression relative to healthy comparison subjects.

Method  Proton (1H) MRS and 13C MRS data were collected for 23 medication-free individuals with major depression and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling from voxels situated in the occipital cortex.

Results  Mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was 26% lower in the depression group. Paradoxically, no difference was found in the rate of the glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). A significant correlation was observed between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle in the overall sample.

Conclusions  The authors interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Articles
Books
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 47.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 45.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 45.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 35.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 47.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
APA Guidelines
PubMed Articles