0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

1
Letter to the Editor   |    
Geography of U.S. Psychiatric Disease by MEDLINE Publications, 1990–1997
E. BEN WELCH, PHARM.D.; DENNIS F. THOMPSON, PHARM.D.
Am J Psychiatry 1999;156:2018-2019.

To the Editor: Thompson (1) recently evaluated the rates of MEDLINE publications from individual states in the United States. When they were normalized by resident populations, he found that several smaller states (Vermont, Washington, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Iowa) outperformed larger states in the number of MEDLINE publications per year per each 100,000 of the population. Benzer et al. (2) showed similar results on an international scale by using EMBASE publications. Curious as to how a subspecialty analysis might compare on a nationwide basis, we evaluated MEDLINE publications on psychiatric disease that were normalized by state populations.

The MEDLINE database was searched through the Internet provider PUBMED during the week of March 10–14, 1999. By means of the advanced search option, the "publication" field was searched for the dates 1990 to 1997. Next, the MSH field was searched for the term "mental disorders." This was limited to human studies only and combined with a search of the "author affiliation" field for each individual state. Population data were obtained from the Population Estimates Program’s Bureau of the Census Web site.

The F1 provides a color-coded breakdown of individual states by quintiles. States that appear in the orange group include Maryland, Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, Washington, and Iowa. States that ranked high in publications dealing with psychiatric disorders that were not ranked high for total biomedical publications included Rhode Island and New York. New York, in particular, had a high number of total psychiatry publications (615 per year) and per population (34 publications per year per each 1 million of the population).

There are obvious limitations to this analysis. Simple publication numbers such as these are crude estimates of the research and scholarship among states. In addition, these data reflect neither the quality nor the usefulness of the published articles. The data do highlight those states that are active in research and scholarship in psychiatric illness.

Thompson DF: Geography of US biomedical publications, 1990 to 1997. N Engl J Med  1999; 340:817–818
 
Benzer A, Pomaroli A, Hauffe H, Schmutzhard E: Geographical analysis of medical publications in 1990 (letter). Lancet  1993; 341:247
 
+

References

Thompson DF: Geography of US biomedical publications, 1990 to 1997. N Engl J Med  1999; 340:817–818
 
Benzer A, Pomaroli A, Hauffe H, Schmutzhard E: Geographical analysis of medical publications in 1990 (letter). Lancet  1993; 341:247
 
+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Books
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 30.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 30.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 30.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 30.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 30.  >
Psychiatric News
PubMed Articles