0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
SENSORY DEPRIVATION A Review
PHILIP SOLOMON; P. HERBERT LEIDERMAN; JACK MENDELSON; DONALD WEXLER
Am J Psychiatry 1957;114:357-363.
View Author and Article Information

Asst. clin. professor of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, physician-in-chief for psychiatry, Boston City Hospital.

Teaching fellow in psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, resident psychiatrist, Mass. General Hospital.

Teaching fellow in psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, clinical and research fellow in psychiatry, Mass. General Hospital.

Assistant in psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, assisting physician in psychiatry, Boston City Hospital.

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

Sensory deprivation has been produced experimentally by reducing the absolute intensity of stimuli, by reducing the patterning of stimuli, and by imposing a structuring of stimuli. Explorers have experienced it voluntarily and prisoners have had it thrust upon them.While there are many separate factors operating in these various situations, it is clear that the stability of man's mental state is dependent on adequate perceptual contact with the outside world. Observations have shown the following common features in cases of sensory deprivation: intense desire for extrinsic sensory stimuli and bodily motion, increased suggestibility, impairment of organized thinking, oppression and depression, and, in extreme cases, hallucinations, delusions, and confusion.Though the basic concepts regarding perceptual and sensory deprivation are not new, their recent importance in experimental and real life situations has made them increasingly interesting. Future studies in this area may well contribute to our knowledge of the psychological and behavioral patterns of man under conditions of normality and stress.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Web of Science® Times Cited: 106

Related Content
Articles
Books
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 36.  >
Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments > Chapter 18.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 18.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 18.  >
Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments > Chapter 7.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
PubMed Articles