0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
A DEFECTIVE MENTAL MAKE-UP AND THE PERNICIOUS FORMS OF TORTICOLLIS, TINNITUS, NEURALGIA AND PRURITUS
Leland B. Alford
Am J Psychiatry 1922;79:67-74.
View Author and Article Information

Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo.

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

The object of this communication is to indicate that the pernicious forms of tinnitus aurium and pruritus of the ano-genital region, spasmodic torticollis and trigeminal neuralgia may be similar in nature and to give the reason for this similarityIt is pointed out that with certain apparent exceptions they are alike as to age of onset, course, resistance to treatment, predominance of one symptom in clinical picture, and central nervous origin.Tinnitus aurium is found not to be an exception if one accepts Gray's contention that the changes in otosclerosis must affect all parts of the biological and physiological unit subserving the function of hearing.Trifacial neuralgia is also not necessarily an exception for the evidence commonly supposed to indicate a peripheral lesion is from another point of view equally in favor of a central disorder.The psychic deviations frequently associated with tinnitus do not seem to conform to classical types of mental disorder. Psychic deviations also are said to occur in the other forms but their nature cannot be ascertained.The nature of the patient's mental reaction to symptoms in these forms is indicative of something more than a peripheral disturbance.Gray's conception of a degenerative defect limited to a biological and physiological unit offers the best explanation of the pathogenesis of these forms of neurosis and gives the reason for their similarity as to age of onset and course, stability of clinical picture, resistance to therapy, predominance of one symptom, central nervous origin, and the association of uncommon psychic deviations. This conception should prove of further service in the study of neuroses and psychoses.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Books
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 21.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 14.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 14.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 30.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 27.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News