0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

1
Letter to the Editor   |    
Drs. Harmer, Goodwin, and Cowen Reply
Catherine J. Harmer, D.Phil.; Guy M. Goodwin, D.Phil., F.R.C.Psych.; Philip J. Cowen, M.D., F.R.C.Psych.
Am J Psychiatry 2010;167:599-600. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2010.09121733r
View Author and Article Information

The authors' disclosures accompany the original article.

Accepted January , 2010.

Copyright © American Psychiatric Association

To the Editor: We thank Dr. Hierholzer for his interest in our hypothesis that antidepressant drug treatments have early effects on the evaluation of emotional material, which are important in the development of clinical mood change over time (1). We agree that this hypothesis of antidepressant drug action may also extend to anxiety disorders. In his clinical observations, he suggests that anger is reduced early on with SSRI treatment in PTSD. These clinical observations are consistent with an earlier study (2), which found a decrease in anger recognition following 7 days of administration of the SSRI citalopram in healthy volunteers. It is encouraging that these findings in healthy people in a laboratory setting may translate into a different patient group and to a real-world setting. Consistent with these findings, Davidson et al. (3) reported that early effects on anger and irritability were predictive of therapeutic response to sertraline in individuals with PTSD.

To test Dr. Hierholzer's clinical observations using a cognitive psychology approach, it will be important to observe whether behavioral and neural biases toward anger-related stimuli can be measured in PTSD and whether these are resolved early in the course of SSRI treatment. It will also be important to assess whether the magnitude of change in anger processing seen early on in treatment is able to predict later therapeutic benefit of drug treatment. These clinical observations are vital in the interpretation of our laboratory findings, and we hope that the continued interplay between clinical and empirical data will further build upon this approach.

Harmer  CJ;  Goodwin  GM;  Cowen  PJ:  Why do antidepressants take so long to work? A cognitive neuropsychological model of antidepressant drug action.  Br J Psychiatry 2009; 195:102—108
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Harmer  CJ;  Shelley  NC;  Cowen  PJ;  Goodwin  GM:  Increased positive versus negative affective perception and memory in healthy volunteers following selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition.  Am J Psychiatry 2004; 161:1256—1263
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Davidson  J;  Landerman  LR;  Clary  CM:  Improvement of anger at one week predicts the effects of sertraline and placebo in PTSD.  J Psychiatr Res 2004; 38:497—502
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
References Container
+

References

Harmer  CJ;  Goodwin  GM;  Cowen  PJ:  Why do antidepressants take so long to work? A cognitive neuropsychological model of antidepressant drug action.  Br J Psychiatry 2009; 195:102—108
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Harmer  CJ;  Shelley  NC;  Cowen  PJ;  Goodwin  GM:  Increased positive versus negative affective perception and memory in healthy volunteers following selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition.  Am J Psychiatry 2004; 161:1256—1263
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
Davidson  J;  Landerman  LR;  Clary  CM:  Improvement of anger at one week predicts the effects of sertraline and placebo in PTSD.  J Psychiatr Res 2004; 38:497—502
[CrossRef] | [PubMed]
 
References Container
+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Books
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 35.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 5th Edition > Chapter 12.  >
Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 7th Edition > Chapter 2.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 5th Edition > Chapter 12.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 2.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
APA Guidelines
PubMed Articles
Escitalopram-induced Parkinsonism. Gen Hosp Psychiatry 2014 Jan-Feb;36(1):126.e1-2.