0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
Modifying Resilience Mechanisms in At-Risk Individuals: A Controlled Study of Mindfulness Training in Marines Preparing for Deployment
Douglas C. Johnson, Ph.D.; Nathaniel J. Thom, Ph.D.; Elizabeth A. Stanley, Ph.D.; Lori Haase, Ph.D.; Alan N. Simmons, Ph.D.; Pei-an B. Shih, Ph.D.; Wesley K. Thompson, Ph.D.; Eric G. Potterat, Ph.D.; Thomas R. Minor, Ph.D.; Martin P. Paulus, M.D.
Am J Psychiatry 2014;:. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13040502
View Author and Article Information

From the Warfighter Performance Department, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego; the Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla; Department of Applied Health Science, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Ill.; the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.; the Mind Fitness Training Institute, Alexandria, Va.; the Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles; and Naval Special Warfare Command, San Diego.

Address correspondence to Dr. Johnson (douglas.c.johnson@med.navy.mil).

Copyright © 2014 by the American Psychiatric Association

Received April 15, 2013; Revised September 13, 2013; Revised March 04, 2014; Accepted March 13, 2014.

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

Objective  Military deployment can have profound effects on physical and mental health. Few studies have examined whether interventions prior to deployment can improve mechanisms underlying resilience. Mindfulness-based techniques have been shown to aid recovery from stress and may affect brain-behavior relationships prior to deployment. The authors examined the effect of mindfulness training on resilience mechanisms in active-duty Marines preparing for deployment.

Method  Eight Marine infantry platoons (N=281) were randomly selected. Four platoons were assigned to receive mindfulness training (N=147) and four were assigned to a training-as-usual control condition (N=134). Platoons were assessed at baseline, 8 weeks after baseline, and during and after a stressful combat training session approximately 9 weeks after baseline. The mindfulness training condition was delivered in the form of 8 weeks of Mindfulness-Based Mind Fitness Training (MMFT), a program comprising 20 hours of classroom instruction plus daily homework exercises. MMFT emphasizes interoceptive awareness, attentional control, and tolerance of present-moment experiences. The main outcome measures were heart rate, breathing rate, plasma neuropeptide Y concentration, score on the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale, and brain activation as measured by functional MRI.

Results  Marines who received MMFT showed greater reactivity (heart rate [d=0.43]) and enhanced recovery (heart rate [d=0.67], breathing rate [d=0.93]) after stressful training; lower plasma neuropeptide Y concentration after stressful training (d=0.38); and attenuated blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal in the right insula and anterior cingulate.

Conclusions  The results show that mechanisms related to stress recovery can be modified in healthy individuals prior to stress exposure, with important implications for evidence-based mental health research and treatment.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Articles
Books
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 6.  >
APA Practice Guidelines > Chapter 0.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 31.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 49.  >
APA Practice Guidelines > Chapter 12.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
PubMed Articles