0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

1
Letter to the Editor   |    
Growth of Interest in Personality Disorders
LARS VON KNORRING, M.D., PH.D.; LISA EKSELIUS, M.D., PH.D.; VIVEKA ALTON, B.SCI.
Am J Psychiatry 2001;158:1168-1168. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.158.7.1168

To the Editor: Roger K. Blashfield, Ph.D., and Vincent Intoccia, B.A. (1), after a search of MEDLINE, 1966–1995, reported that the growth rate in the literature on personality disorders has not increased since the introduction of DSM-III. There are problems involved in the methodology chosen. The leading journals in the field, Personality and Individual Differences, official journal of the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences (founded in 1983), and the Journal of Personality Disorders, official journal of the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (founded in 1988), are indexed in a variety of databases but not in MEDLINE. Thus, MEDLINE seems to be an insufficient source from which to elucidate the growth of literature in the field. Furthermore, the MeSH heading "personality disorder" in MEDLINE is not used to cover personality disorders as they are usually defined in the literature. Furthermore, the MeSH headings of individual personality disorders have been imprecise and have changed during the years. Dr. Blashfield and Mr. Intoccia (1) had to search for individual personality disorders and total them. However, it has been more common to use broad personality questionnaires to cover all personality disorders, and often individual personality disorders are not reported in the title or as key words.

Thus, we have made a reevaluation through a search of PsycINFO, in which both of the previously mentioned journals are indexed. The search was performed on "personality disorders," both as a key word and as title text.

In 1980 and after, the number of publications concerning personality disorders increased rapidly. The best-fitting trend line is an exponential curve. Before 1980 (1968–1979), the mean number of publications per year was 39.3 (SD=16.4), and in 1980 and after, it increased to 241.5 (SD=142.8) articles a year (z=4.06, p<0.0001, Mann-Whitney U test). We searched the 5 years immediately before the introduction of DSM-III (1975–1979) and the last 5 years (1991–1995), and we found that the number of publications increased from 50.2 (SD=6.0) to 403.2 (SD=36.5) articles a year (z=2.61, p<0.01, Mann-Whitney U test). The rate of increase is more pronounced than the growth of the general medical literature, which doubles about once every 23 years (1).

In a recent article (2), McDonald et al. demonstrated that out of the 977 psychiatry journals identified in Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory, 38% were indexed in PsychLIT, 34% in EMBASE, 25% in BIOSIS, and only 24% in MEDLINE. However, a total of 213 abstracting and indexing services were identified. Thus, it is easy to agree with McDonald et al. (2) that it is important to search more than one or even two databases to ensure optimal coverage of the literature.

Blashfield RK, Intoccia V: Growth of the literature on the topic of personality disorders. Am J Psychiatry  2000; 157:472-473
[PubMed]
[CrossRef]
 
McDonald S, Taylor L, Adams C: Searching the right database: a comparison of four databases for psychiatry journals. Health Libr Rev  1999; 16:151-156
[PubMed]
[CrossRef]
 
+

References

Blashfield RK, Intoccia V: Growth of the literature on the topic of personality disorders. Am J Psychiatry  2000; 157:472-473
[PubMed]
[CrossRef]
 
McDonald S, Taylor L, Adams C: Searching the right database: a comparison of four databases for psychiatry journals. Health Libr Rev  1999; 16:151-156
[PubMed]
[CrossRef]
 
+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Related Content
Books
Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 7th Edition > Chapter 2.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 5th Edition > Chapter 3.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 5th Edition > Chapter 20.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 50.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 50.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
Read more at Psychiatric News >>
APA Guidelines
PubMed Articles
Corrigendum. Int J Soc Psychiatry 2014;60(6):615.
Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 2014;10():1469-77.