0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
STUDIES OF BEHAVIOR AND THE METABOLISM OF INDOLE DERIVATIVES IN SCHIZOPHRENIA
NYLA J. COLE; ROGER B. ALLISON, JR.; MELVIN J. GORTATOWSKI; C. H. HARDIN BRANCH
Am J Psychiatry 1960;117:393-400.
View Author and Article Information

Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Utah, and Veterans Administration Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah.

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

1. Urinary indole excretion of spot 14 appears to depend upon the presence of certain bacterial flora in the gut.2. When extraction of urine for chromatographic examination is carried out at pH 2.5, there appears to be no direct relationship between the appearance of indole 14 in the urine and the mental status classified as schizophrenia.3. From the dietary drug studies reported, we would conclude that the probable source of this indole derivative that was examined (spot 14) is from bacterial flora acting upon certain dietary substances in the gut.As Benjamin, Kety(38, 9), and others have pointed out, the area of psychiatric research to date which has a rather fruitless history is the search for definite and discrete biological abnormalities as presumed etiological factors in the development of the schizophrenias. In the main, when rigid controls have been maintained and research design has allowed for examination of all possibilities, an expected primary causal relationship generally fades into being a secondary manifestation of factors intrinsic to the diagnosis of schizophrenia, such as dietary differences, institutionalization, behavioral differences, and so forth. This has been well illustrated recently by the fate, for example, of interest in ceruloplasmin(28, 39) and in phenolic acid excretion (40). In the author's opinion, the particular indole compound we have studied, i.e., "spot 14," can be included in the above category.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Related Content
Articles
Books
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 15.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 3.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 62.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 3.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Geriatric Psychiatry, 4th Edition > Chapter 26.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
APA Guidelines
PubMed Articles